RUIZ DE LA CASA (Spain)


RINCÓN DE PUEBLO
oil, 25.5 x 32 in.

REALES ALCAZARES, SEVILLA - FOUNTAIN
oil , 30 x 24 in.

LA ALHAMBRA
oil, 44.5 x 28.5 in.

PASEO
oil, 25.5 x 32 in.

ESTANQUE
oil, 36 x 28.5 in.

RINCON PARA LA SIESTA
oil, 18 x 22 in.

JARDINES DE ARANJUEZ
oil, 22 x 26 in.

JARDINES DE SEVILLA
oil, 10 x 13 in.

REALES ALCAZARES, SEVILLA
oil, 26 x 32 in.

CHINESCO
oil, 26 x 32 in.

JARDINES DE LA ISLA
oil, 22 x 26 in.

REALES ALCAZARES - SEVILLA I
oil, 24 x 30 in.

Angel Ruiz de la Casa was born and raised in Madrid, Spain.  As a young boy he was attracted to the Impressionist movement, most notably Claude Monet and Joaquin Sorolla, the great masters of color and light.  Since infancy the young Angel preferred to draw and paint instead of playing with other children.  He says, “…It is obvious I was born to paint.”

His family could not afford many of the luxuries in life, so the young artist attended the Madrid State Arts and Crafts schools. Once he finished his studies he went to work in the studios of three great masters: D. Jose Bardasano, D.J. Molina Nunez, and D.A. Nunes de Celis. Under their tutelage he learned the practical facets of the profession, which are not always taught in the more formal schools.

Painting from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm, de la Casa spent the rest of his time reading and researching new subjects to bring to his viewers. He explains:

“Above all I always long that my paintings will inspire my viewer to have happiness in living and the desire to find oneself in the sunny gardens which are a constant fixture in the majority of my work. I like paintings with vitality and optimism.”

De la Casa’s work is disseminated among many well-known people in Europe, mainly throughout Spain, and appears in the private collections of politicians, doctors and other artists. His work has appeared in exhibitions throughout Spain, Holland, Belgium, Germany, Mexico and the United States. De la Casa likes to quote a Madrid newspaper article concerning his work:

“With the exhibition of Angel Ruiz’ oils, the cultural association ‘Friends of Alcazar’ intends to openly espouse one purpose: to undertake with serenity and enthusiasm a task as suggestive as to invoke the presence of the best amidst the impenitent harassment of the mediocre.”